jcrableJena Crable

All articles by jcrable

 

Fishing or Real Genealogy Research?

Note: the following post is written by Dr. Terrence M. Punch, an expert in genealogy research related to maritime Canada. Since the 1970s, he has published numerous books on Scottish, Irish and French immigration. He has written other posts for this blog, including the popular How our Ancestors Died. Below, Dr. Punch discusses the pitfalls that can trip
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Pastimes of our Ancestors

The following post, “A Lighter Side of History — A Timeline of Pastimes of our Ancestors,” is written by author Denise R. Larson. Ms. Larson is the acclaimed author of the recently updated and rereleased Companions of Champlain, which provides a concise historical overview of the founding of Quebec and French-Canadian culture. She has also authored other posts
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Thomas Jefferson sums up the War of 1812

The following post is by Denise R. Larson, the author of the 2016 edition of History for Genealogists. If you were a reader of the original 2009 edition, you will enjoy the new time lines concerning life on the homefront during America’s 20th-century wars; and fashion and leisure in America from its beginnings through the
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Don’t use tape, glue to preserve documents or books

Let’s all take a moment and remember the basics of preserving a genealogy collection. In a time when it’s increasingly easy to store your work on a flash drive or in the cloud, we may have to actively remember to take care of the priceless collections of memories held in books, documents and printed photographs, instead
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Elusive ancestor holds on to his secrets

Editor’s note: I came across this piece from the Mercury News a few days ago in my daily traipsing around the Internet. The original author, Joan Morris, speaks of her search for a particularly hard to find ancestor. What caught my eye was her use of pension records and how important they were to finding her ancestor.
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New Book Release: History for Genealogists

The recently updated and rereleased History for Genealogists—Using Chronological Time Lines to Find and Understand Your Ancestors is a rare bird for genealogists: it’s one of the very few history books in print that is written for genealogists As the subtitle to the 2016 expanded and revised edition of Judy Jacobson’s best-selling book indicates, this sought
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Schlegel’s American Families of German Ancestry in the United States

It’s an irony of German-American genealogy that what some consider the single greatest collection of family histories in this field is barely known to researchers. The work in question is Carl W. Schlegel’s four-volume American Families of German Ancestry in the United States, published between 1916 and 1926. Each of Schlegel’s four volumes was limited
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Learning about family trees through court records

We came across this article, “Learning about family trees through court records,” published in The Daily Nebraskan. It recounts the local Genealogy Over Lunch group’s discussion of utilizing court records for family history research. We have posted several pieces on this blog about the importance of visiting the courthouse in person, as well as the
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Canadian Census Tips from Denise Larson

The following post is from author, Denise Larson, who has offered her expertise on other topics such as Maine Genealogy in two parts, as well as the recently posted piece about Canada’s upcoming anniversaries. This year, 2016, marks the sesquarcentennial—350th anniversary—of the first official census taken in Canada. Only 163 pages long and enumerated in
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The Carlin Clan of North West Ireland

Editor’s note: The following brief history of the Carlin clan associated with County Donegal and County Derry is indicative of what the reader can expect to encounter with each of the 300+ histories of surnames compiled by Brian Mitchell in his book, The Surnames of North West Ireland: Concise Histories of the Major Surnames of Gaelic
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Locating and Visiting Cemeteries

Editor’s note: The following post is by William Dollarhide, who has not only provided excellent tips of both the serious and witty variety, but is an accomplished Genealogical Publishing Company author. As Mr. Dollarhide excels not only an author but also as a gifted speaker and award winning genealogist, we are always delighted to share
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The People of Aberdeen, Scotland

Genealogical Publishing Company is pleased to announce another excellent publication from author and expert,  David Dobson, The People of the Scottish Burghs: A Genealogical Source Book. The People of Aberdeen, 1600-1799. Many genealogical researchers are familiar with other publications from Dr. Dobson, such as Irish Emigrants in North America and Scottish-German Links, 1550-1850, just two titles of over twenty acclaimed works in the
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Origins and Descendants of White Slave Children of Colonial Maryland and Virginia

Editor’s Note: The following post is written by Genealogical Publishing Company author Dr. Richard Hayes Phillips. His books tread into territory that has been previously underreported, colonial white slave children. In his post below, Dr. Phillips discussing some of his research efforts that went into the making of White Slave Children of Colonial Maryland and Virginia: Birth and
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White Slave Children of Maryland and Virginia

Picking up where he left off in his acclaimed book Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records, Dr. Richard Hayes Phillips has now taken the story back even further — back to the scenes of the original crimes–kidnapping of children to be sold into slavery (ca. 1660-1720). In his original book, Dr.
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White Slavery – A Story Behind the Index

Editor’s note: In this groundbreaking work, Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records, Richard Hayes Phillips has collected the names of more than five thousand children kidnapped from Ireland, Scotland, England, and New England, and sold into white slavery in Maryland and Virginia, c. 1660-1720. As this topic tends to be largely under
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Chronology of Spanish troops in the Revolutionary War

Leroy Martinez’ new book, From Across the Spanish Empire: Spanish Soldiers Who Helped Win the American Revolutionary War, 1776-1783, provides the first comprehensive list of Spanish soldiers who served in North America during the U.S. War for Independence.  Separate chapters list those who served in Arizona, California, Louisiana, New Mexico, and Texas. In most cases
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The Making of From Across the Spanish Empire

Editor’s note: We are delighted to share this behind the scenes look at the making of From Across the Spanish Empire: Spanish Soldiers Who Helped Win the American Revolutionary War, 1776-1783, written by Leroy Martinez. This newly released book is the first to identify the Spanish combatants serving in North America during the American Revolution. At the heart of
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Celebrating Canada’s Anniversaries

Editor’s Note: The following post celebrating notable Canadian anniversaries, such as the 150th anniversary of the confederation of Canada, is by Genealogical Publishing Company author Denise Larson. We’ve featured her writing here on the blog before, in such posts as Maine Genealogy Parts I and II, and Genealogy Isn’t Just Finding Dead People. Ms. Larson’s published work
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Michael A. Ports and the Genealogy Bug

Editor’s Note: Genealogist and professional hydrologist Michael A. Ports, Ph.D., is one of the most prolific authors in the recent history of this blog’s parent company, Genealogical Publishing Company. Spanning scarcely (three) years, he has produced twenty-two separate publications for Genealogical.com. Dr. Ports has authored separate research guides in our laminated series, “Genealogy at a Glance”
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Naturalization and Denization records in genealogy research

As a body of records, naturalization and denization records are of considerable value, but, until recently, were very difficult to access. Comparable in many ways to census records, naturalization records are a mine of priceless information and include such items as place and date of birth, foreign and current places of residence, marital status, names,
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Fill in the Census Records Research Gaps

Utilizing census records are a fundamental resource for any genealogists. There are two situations discussed here where the federal census records leave information gaps. Namely, when you’re searching for a relative before the federal census of 1790, and when you can’t find someone you know should show up on a federal census. A relative who predates
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How to find your ancestor without a passenger list

No Passenger List? No official U.S. government passenger lists exist prior to 1820. What miscellaneous lists that have survived and been transcribed or published cover only a fraction of the immigrants who arrived in the Americas before 1820. If you do not possess a passenger list for your immigrant ancestor, are you at the end
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Census Records and County Boundary Changes

Editor’s note: The following post on the importance of knowing the county in order to properly utilize census records, and how shifting boundaries can affect that search, is written by author William Dollarhide. An excellent source that can be used to visualize the county boundaries for every county in the U.S. and for each census
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‘Tis the Season for Genealogy Gifts

Editor’s note: The following is a version of a post originally by the late Carolyn L. Barkley. Her ideas of what to give the genealogist in your life are just as awesome today as they were several years ago when this post was drafted. As technology has improved and prices have changed, some edits and updates were
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Books reveal vital details of African-American history

We are pleased to share that two of our new releases were reviewed in the Atlanta Journal Constitution on November 14, 2015. Georgia Free Persons of Color, Volume I and Georgia Free Persons of Color, Volume II, by Michael A. Ports. Both of these volumes provide crucial information which will help researchers trying to trace their own African-American history. An 1818 statute
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Use the Holidays to Learn About Your Family History

Editor’s note: The following post is a reprint a guest column by Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander. You can see the original post, printed online in The Missouri Times, at this link. While he focuses on Missouri resources, he mentions some fantastic resources that exist in other states as well. His ideas of where to start
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How to Locate Church Records

Editor’s Note: The following post is by Myra Vanderpool Gormley, CG. She is an accomplished researcher and writer, known to many of us from her work as the columnist of “Shaking the Family Tree,” as the former editor of RootsWeb Review, and as a founder of the International Society of Family History Writers and Editors.  
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Early South Carolina History

Editor’s Note: Many of the titles hyperlinked or referenced in this article will be on sale for 24 hours, beginning December 1 and ending at 11:59pm EST, 2015, at Genealogical.com, the parent company of this blog. If your ancestors were part of South Carolina’s storied colonial, Revolutionary, or early national period, this is a great opportunity
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Tax Lists and Genealogy

Are you getting the most out of tax lists for your genealogy research? Do you even know where to start? As Cornelius Carroll states in the beginning of his book, The Beginner’s Guide to Using Tax Lists, “Tax lists are one of the most valuable, but most neglected sources of genealogical information. They cannot only
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Six jokes from 19th Century America

While we are absolutely a genealogy blog, we still appreciate a good (historical) laugh. This piece, care of NPR’s History Department, focuses on jokes from the 19th century. Please visit the original story at NPR.org, and enjoy the six jokes below, excerpted from the article: Here are half a dozen from the 1800s, lightly edited, that may
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How to Clean a Gravestone – Cemetery Preservation

Editor’s Note: This morning I came across a YouTube instructional video on how to clean a gravestone. The method, although appearing very effective from a visual perspective, recommended scraping the stone clear of debris and then using astringent chemicals to clean the stone. This seemed harsh to me, so I went looking through our old posts to see if
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Unprecedented Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia Immigrants

Martha McCartney uses recent historical scholarship as she sets the stage in her remarkable book, Virginia Immigrants and Adventurers, 1607-1635: A Biographical Dictionary. We’re focusing on this unprecedented trove of information, formatted as an easy to use biographical dictionary of early Virginia immigrants, and sharing an excerpt from the book.  Soon after the fateful landing of 1607,
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Jacobite Rebellion & Immigration to Colonial America

The following post, “Jacobitism & American Colonial Immigration,” is by renowned author and expert David Dobson. In the following, Mr. Dobson discusses the Jacobite movement, and the impact of its failure in immigration to Colonial America.  Jacobite Rebellion & Immigration to Colonial America What was Jacobitism and what relevance did it have for immigration to
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Utilizing the Library of Congress Genealogy Website

The US Library of Congress (LOC) is the greatest repository of published works in the country including genealogy, local history books and periodicals.  Whether or not you are planning to visit the LOC, located in Washington, DC, in-person soon, it will benefit you to visit its website. To get on the LOC site, start at its homepage:
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Cemetery Symbolism

Just as the days are grow shorter and the nights longer, Halloween approaches and brings some ghoulishly clever articles along with it. If you find that the falling leaves make you want to visit your fallen fellows, take a stroll around your local graveyard. Cemeteries can be an incredibly rich source of information for your family history research, and
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Federal Records of the Five Civilized Tribes

The following excerpt is from the book, Tracing Ancestors Among the Five Civilized Tribes, by Rachal Mills Lennon. This body of work has been the best-selling guide to a very difficult area of research for over a decade. Ms. Lennon, M.A., CG, specializes in resolving difficult Southern research problems and reconstructing obscure lives, especially those
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Missing Ancestors? Check the Feeder States!

Here’s a familiar genealogical conundrum: A researcher has traced his/her ancestors from present-day California back to the Dust Bowl-era in Nebraska, into Missouri just as it was achieving statehood, and finally to Indiana in the 1830s. At that point, the trail has grown cold even though legend has it that the family patriarch was a
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Descendants of Eastern Cherokees

Between May 1905 and April 1907, the U.S. Supreme Court authorized the Secretary of the Interior to identify the descendants of Eastern Cherokees entitled to participate in the distribution of more than $1 million authorized by Congress. The purpose of the authorization was to settle outstanding claims made under treaties between the U.S. government and
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Why Do So Many Americans Think They Have Cherokee Blood?

When I lived in the Southern US, I didn’t pay much attention to someone claiming Cherokee ancestry. Generally, I brushed off friends’ claims of being some minuscule fraction Cherokee, as when pressed on the source of this information it was always a mix of word-of-mouth, distant relation or family lure with a healthy measure of questionable math.
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Genealogist, Charles Banks

Master Works of Charles Edward Banks: A Great Great Man and a Gifted Genealogist Students of New England genealogy recognize Charles E. Banks (1854-1931) as one of the patriarchs of genealogical scholarship. During his lifetime, he was widely acknowledged to be one of the leading authorities on northern New England families. His two-volume History of York,
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Do you have Royal Ancestors?

If you are just getting started in your search on royal lineage, please check out our post How to Trace Royal Lineage – Basics for Your Research. However, if you are in hot pursuit of your royal ancestry, or are looking for additional resources that detail royal ancestors in America, the following post contains detailed information
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Principal Families of The Metis People

Principal Families of the Metis People Specified Gail Morin’s series tracing the children of intermarriage between early French fur traders and Canadian Native Americans, known as Métis or Métis People, has now reached four volumes. Mrs. Morin has now given us a list of the primary families who figure in each volume, so researchers can make
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Spotlight – Northern New England Genealogy Resources

The northern New England states of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont were inhabited later than their southern neighbors and one way or another, derived or wrested their existence from them. Maine, for example, once the property of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, was acquired by Massachusetts in 1677 and became known as the Province of Maine of
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Welsh Surnames – A Glimpse of “The Surnames of Wales”

Editor’s Note: The following post relates to the new edition of John and Sheila Rowlands’ The Surnames of Wales. Those interested in tracing their Welsh genealogy may find this to be a valuable resource. Researchers less familiar with the nuances of Welsh genealogy, should also consider the Rowlands’ Welsh Family History, A Guide to Research. Second Edition as a starting
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Maps For Genealogy– Essential for Research

Editor’s note: The following post is by Joe Roop Brickey. Ms. Brickey is a familiar face in the Genealogical Publishing Company’s booth at national conferences. She is a former board member of the Federation of Genealogical Societies [FGS] and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries Scotland. She resides in Charlotte, North Carolina. This article
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Drawing Your Home – Another Dimension to your Genealogy

Editor’s Note: The following post is by Joe Roop Brickey, originally entitled “Adding Another Dimension to Your Genealogy.” This article originally appeared in Heritage Quest, 16, no. 3, issue 87 (May/June 2000). It is reprinted here by permission of the publisher. Joe Roop Brickey is a familiar face in the Genealogical Publishing Company’s booth at national conferences.
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German Genealogy – Tool for Locating Ancestors

If you find a ship’s passenger record for a German ancestor, will you automatically know where to look for your ancestor’s records in Germany? If you cannot find the passenger record, does this mean that you will never learn where your German ancestor came from? According to the authors of Ancestors in German Archives: A Guide
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Genetic Citations for Genealogists

As Elizabeth Mills explains at the outset of her latest laminated research aid, Citing Genetic sources for History Research Evidence Style, “Genetic tests are used today in non-scientific fields to help: (1) resolve questions of identity; and (2) determine the correct family unit to which a person belongs. Researchers who integrate genetic testing with traditional
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Too Many Books!

Editor’s Note: The following post is by Joe Roop Brickey, a familiar face in the Genealogical Publishing Company’s booth at national conferences. She is a former board member of the Federation of Genealogical Societies [FGS] and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries Scotland. She resides in Charlotte, North Carolina. Please read her other
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Did Your Ancestors Come with William the Conqueror?

There is no greater challenge in British-American genealogy than establishing a connection to William the Conqueror. After all, in the year 1066 at the Battle of Hastings, William, Duke of Normandy, was the last person to conquer England. All subsequent British history is an outgrowth of the amalgamation of the victorious Norman and the vanquished
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