Cost_Northern_Maine_and_New_Brunswick

Genealogist’s Handbook for Upper Saint John Valley Research

The guidebook, “Genealogist’s Handbook for Upper Saint John Valley Research,” teaches genealogists how to find ancestors on both the Maine and New Brunswick sides of the Upper Saint John River Valley, a region that ultimately became home to the indigenous Maliseets, Acadians, French-Canadians, Irish, a few Scots, and a few (mostly English) Loyalists. The extant records of the valley (found in both local and distant archives) extend from 1792 to the 20th century, and, following his historical introduction, Mr. George L. Findlen devotes the bulk of his narrative to an inventory of them. Separate chapters are devoted to each of the following record categories: church registers (probably the most valuable of all records), vital records, marriages, cemetery records, censuses, land records, will and probate documents, newspapers, as well as the various record repositories themselves.

Image credit: The coast of northern Maine and New Brunswick, via Wikimedia Commons.

Lake_Louise_Canada_Banff

Finding Your Canadian Roots

For many U.S. genealogy wayfarers, their journey usually includes a stop in Canada. Surprisingly, this is true for persons with and without French-Canadian roots. Not surprisingly, living along the 3,000-mile border that separates the U.S. from its northern neighbor are innumerable families who share common ancestries as a result of their desire for greater economic, religious, or political freedom–in one country or the other.

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LordDeLaWarr

400th Anniversary of the Landing at Jamestown 1607-2007

The year 2007 marked the 400th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown, the first permanent English colony in America. From its tentative start as a small fort on an island in the James River, with barely more than 150 inhabitants, Jamestown became a model for the colonization of the New World. Its founders – planters and indentured servants alike – established a formula for immigration and settlement, and laid the foundation for the leap-frog expansion into the hinterland. Because of its unchallenged position in American history, the 400th anniversary of Jamestown was marked as a milestone in 2007.

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John Winthrop, Massachusetts, Charles Banks

Genealogist, Charles Banks

Master Works of Charles Edward Banks: A Great Great Man and a Gifted Genealogist

Students of New England genealogy recognize Charles E. Banks (1854-1931) as one of the patriarchs of genealogical scholarship. During his lifetime, he was widely acknowledged to be one of the leading authorities on northern New England families. His two-volume History of York, Maine (a third volume was in preparation at the time of his death) is still the starting point on its subject. Though removed from his primary geographical area of expertise, Dr. Banks’ three-volume history of Martha’s Vineyard is also a model local history.

Notwithstanding his fame as a genealogist, Banks’ first calling was as a physician and surgeon. A graduate of Dartmouth Medical School, Charles Banks enjoyed a distinguished 40-year career in the U.S. Public Health Service. Dr. Banks was involved in many activities, including early efforts to thwart polio and to enforce sanitary laws. He achieved the position of assistant surgeon-general of the USPHS, retiring with the rank of lieutenant-colonel.

Besides his interests in genealogy and history, Banks was a skillful artist. His drawings adorn several of his publications. He is also reckoned to have been gracious, kindly, and un-self-serving. He was never reluctant to share the fruits of his research with friends and colleagues. Continue reading…