Lake_Louise_Canada_Banff

Finding Your Canadian Roots

For many U.S. genealogy wayfarers, their journey usually includes a stop in Canada. Surprisingly, this is true for persons with and without French-Canadian roots. Not surprisingly, living along the 3,000-mile border that separates the U.S. from its northern neighbor are innumerable families who share common ancestries as a result of their desire for greater economic, religious, or political freedom–in one country or the other.

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Metis people, Metis genealogy

Principal Families of The Metis People

Principal Families of the Metis People Specified

Gail Morin’s series tracing the children of intermarriage between early French fur traders and Canadian Native Americans, known as Métis or Métis People, has now reached four volumes. Mrs. Morin has now given us a list of the primary families who figure in each volume, so researchers can make an educated guess about their potential family connections in each book. Brief descriptions of each volume and lists of which principal families each book contains follow below.

Please note that this is a very list heavy post, but hopefully you’ll find your family name in one or more of the volumes and be able to identify it as a resource.

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Augusta, Maine, Maine Genealogy

Maine Genealogy Resources, Part II

Editor’s Note: The following is the second part of Denise R. Larson’s articles on Maine genealogy resources. In Maine Genealogy Resources Part I, Ms. Larson described the historical forces and settlement patterns that form the background to Maine genealogy. Denise Larson is the author of Maine, Genealogy at a Glance: French-Canadian Genealogy Research. Her contribution to the Genealogy at a Glance series is particularly helpful when searching for French-Canadian immigrants, and offers historical background notes and pointers on where to look for census returns, vital records, and other documentation.

In the concluding installment on Maine genealogy, Ms. Larson offers excellent practical advice on the how and where to conduct Maine genealogical research, as well as additional publications that will assist you on this search. 

Great places to do Maine Genealogy

Of particular note in the search for genealogical materials is the Cultural Center on State Street in Augusta, which houses the Maine State Archives, Library, and Museum.

Maine State Archives

The Maine State Archives (207-287-5795) has online databases for general search, early court cases, maps, municipal records, photographs.

The archives’ genealogy research website offers an index to vital statistics (birth, death, marriage) 1908-1922. Copies of certificates are available from 1892-1922 at the cost of $10 per copy; certified copies are $15.

Many official records are on microfilm and can be viewed in the archives’ Search Room. These include vital records 1922-1955, U.S. Census returns 1790-1930, an index of Revolutionary War land grants and pension applications, and a good collection of photographs of officers.

Prior to 1892, the towns and cities of Maine kept the local records of births, marriages, and deaths. As of 1892, the state became responsible for vital records. Municipalities were asked to provide copies of the pre-1892 records, and they are included in the Delayed Vital Records microfilm. The records of some of the noncompliant towns were later microfilmed and added to the collection but not all were included and some town records were lost through flood, fire, or mishap.

Staff members at the Maine State Archives will search within a five-year period for a record upon request and receipt of payment. The search fee is included in the cost of the copy, which is nonrefundable if a record is not found.

Copies of vital records and divorce decrees from 1923 and later are available from Office of Data, Research and Vital Statistics, State House Station #11, 244 Water St., Augusta, ME 04333-0011; 1-888-664-9491; 207-287-5500.

Genealogical Publishing and Broderbund collaborated on Early Maine and New Hampshire Settlers, a CD that displays images of pages from fourteen publications and offers a single electronic name index that allows users to search all volumes, which include biographies, the 1790 census, gravestone inscriptions, pensioners of the American Revolution, probate records, vital records, and wills. Continue reading…