colonial maryland, white slave, white slave children

Origins and Descendants of White Slave Children of Colonial Maryland and Virginia

Editor’s Note: The following post is written by Genealogical Publishing Company author Dr. Richard Hayes Phillips. His books tread into territory that has been previously underreported, colonial white slave children. In his post below, Dr. Phillips discussing some of his research efforts that went into the making of White Slave Children of Colonial Maryland and Virginia: Birth and Shipping Records, as well as the reasons behind writing this book.

The Genealogist as Detective: Richard Hayes Phillips and the Search for the Origins and Descendants of White Slave Children of Colonial Maryland and Virginia

Some time ago I published a book — Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records  — in which are identified, by name, 5290 “servants” without indentures, transported without their consent, against their will, to the Chesapeake Bay, and sentenced to slavery by the County Courts of colonial Maryland and Virginia.  The younger the child, the longer the sentence.  These were white kids, with surnames different from those of their masters. Continue reading…

John Winthrop, Massachusetts, Charles Banks

Genealogist, Charles Banks

Master Works of Charles Edward Banks: A Great Great Man and a Gifted Genealogist

Students of New England genealogy recognize Charles E. Banks (1854-1931) as one of the patriarchs of genealogical scholarship. During his lifetime, he was widely acknowledged to be one of the leading authorities on northern New England families. His two-volume History of York, Maine (a third volume was in preparation at the time of his death) is still the starting point on its subject. Though removed from his primary geographical area of expertise, Dr. Banks’ three-volume history of Martha’s Vineyard is also a model local history.

Notwithstanding his fame as a genealogist, Banks’ first calling was as a physician and surgeon. A graduate of Dartmouth Medical School, Charles Banks enjoyed a distinguished 40-year career in the U.S. Public Health Service. Dr. Banks was involved in many activities, including early efforts to thwart polio and to enforce sanitary laws. He achieved the position of assistant surgeon-general of the USPHS, retiring with the rank of lieutenant-colonel.

Besides his interests in genealogy and history, Banks was a skillful artist. His drawings adorn several of his publications. He is also reckoned to have been gracious, kindly, and un-self-serving. He was never reluctant to share the fruits of his research with friends and colleagues. Continue reading…

Northern New England

Spotlight – Northern New England Genealogy Resources

The northern New England states of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont were inhabited later than their southern neighbors and one way or another, derived or wrested their existence from them. Maine, for example, once the property of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, was acquired by Massachusetts in 1677 and became known as the Province of Maine of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Although Maine was an important battleground during the Revolution and War of 1812, it did not achieve statehood until 1820. New Hampshire, once a part of Maine, came under Massachusetts’ control in 1641. While New Hampshire became a royal province in 1679, it would again be governed by Massachusetts between 1699 and 1741.

Land disputes played an important part in the colonial history of the three northern New England colonies, especially in the case of Vermont, where grantees from New Hampshire and New York held rival claims. Even after the English crown ruled in favor of New York, a number of Vermonters refused to bow to that colony’s demand that they obtain new grants. Instead, they formed the famous Green Mountain Boys, a resistance group that, coincidentally, helped defeat the British at Ft. Ticonderoga and Crown Point during the Revolution. A Vermont assembly ultimately declared independence from New York, and the former colony was granted statehood in 1791.

The people of northern New England were a fairly homogeneous lot prior to 1800. Most colonial inhabitants could trace their roots directly to southern New England or England itself. Eighteenth-century Maine and New Hampshire attracted infusions of Scotch-Irish; New Hampshire attracted some Huguenots as well. During the following century the influx of Canadians – notably from Quebec and Nova Scotia – Scandinavians, and Germans brought greater diversity to the region. Continue reading…

Anne Hutchinson

Notable Ancestors & Descendants of Anne Hutchinson and Katherine Scott

Notable Ancestors & Descendants of Anne Hutchinson and Katherine Scott Anne (Marbury) Hutchinson & Katherine (Marbury) Scott

Anne (Marbury) Hutchinson, the 17th-century Puritan heretic and cofounder of Rhode Island, died in an Indian attack with several of her children only nine years after she arrived in America. Her surviving four children and the children of her sister Katherine (Marbury) Scott produced many descendants with royal or noble ancestors. For example, their American descendants are in the line of King Edward I of England (d. 1307). Through the Marbury connection to Sancha de Ayala, Marbury descendants are related to Ferdinand of Aragon, who with his wife, Isabella of Castille, completed the reunification of Spain in the late 15th century and sponsored the expeditions of Christopher Columbus. All of the later Kings of Spain, Holy Roman and Austrian emperors, kings of Prussia, and Russian czars starting with Alexander I are distant cousins as well, as are most of the later English and French kings. The Marburys are also related to John Dryden, Jonathan Swift, Horace Walpole, and the wives of the poet Edmund Spencer and the diarist Samuel Pepys. Notable 18th-century American descendants of the Marburys include Mrs. John Singleton Copley, wife of the great American portrait painter; Thomas Hutchinson, Jr., the last colonial governor of Massachusetts; Nicholas Gilman, Jr., a signer of the Constitution; and Nicholas Brown, Jr., whose family founded Brown University.

Researchers will find these relationships explained in Royal Families: Americans of Royal and Noble Ancestry. Volume 2–Reverend Francis Marbury and Five Generations of His Descendants Through Anne (Marbury) Hutchinson and Katherine (Marbury) Scott. Compiled by Marston Watson, Royal Families is a series of royal and noble descendancies starting with the immigrant ancestor of the line.

The second edition of the first volume of Royal Families concerns five generations of descendants of Massachusetts Governor Thomas Dudley. It contains nearly 900 new Dudley descendants through the sixth generation. It is likely that several million Americans can prove their descent from this noted governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Americans linked to Governor Thomas Dudley will find near or distant cousins in actor Humphrey Bogart, astronaut Alan Shepard, Jr., Ella Botts Rice (first wife of entrepreneur and movie mogul Howard Hughes), Mary Storer Potter (first wife of poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow), and many more notable kin.

Volume thee of Royal Families discusses the thousands of Americans are direct descendants of Samuel Appleton (1586-1670) of Ipswich, Massachusetts, who had royal and noble connections to William the Conqueror, and of his wife Judith Everard, whose ancestors included William’s sister Adelaide, as well as Louis IV, King of the Franks. The books covers five generations (with their sixth generation children) of Samuel and Judith Appleton descendants, carrying them up to the period of the Revolutionary War and beyond. Where possible, the identity of the parents of each known spouse is also provided, along with relevant biographical, genealogical, and historical details.

Americans linked to Samuel and Judith Appleton will find near or distant cousins among such distinguished individuals as President Franklin Pierce, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Jerome Napoleon Bonaparte, Jr. Other descendants include “signer” William Whipple, Jr., Mrs. John Singleton Copley, James Russell Lowell, Francis Parkman, Jr., Phillips Brooks, Josiah Quincy, Jr., and poet Robert Frost.

Those of you who are interested in lineage societies will find a Lineage Society Index in Volume Three which lists ancestors through whom descendants can claim eligibility for hereditary societies that honor Mayflower passengers, Revolutionary War soldiers, colonial governors, and physicians.

Image credit: Anne Hutchinson on Trial, by Edwin Austin Abbey [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

 

 

Massachusetts Genealogy, "Endicott cutting the cross out of the English flag", illustration depicting an event that occurred in Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634.

Genealogy at a Glance: Massachusetts Genealogy

Like Virginia, many who trace their family history in the United States will at one time or another find Massachusetts genealogy tied into their research.

Here on this blog we have discussed several types of specific research related to Massachusetts genealogy, from Resources to Mayflower Research to Lighthouse and Life-Saving Service Records. Massachusetts genealogy even comes into play when researching your saintly ancestors, as we discussed in our post, Noble Ancestry Leads to the Saint in Your Family.

But what if you’re just getting started, or you aren’t sure yet how to tackle the Massachusetts ties you are sure you’ll encounter?

Author Denise Larson answers this question with Genealogy at a Glance: Massachusetts Genealogy Research. In this quick and handy research aid Ms. Larson begins with an excellent summary of Massachusetts history from its Puritan and Pilgrim beginnings through the mid-19th century. Next comes a discussion of local records, for, as with other New England states, Massachusetts’ records are organized by town, not by county. The author then identifies the major statewide, regional, and ethnic repositories with genealogical and historical collections. The guide concludes with a listing of the major websites for Massachusetts research as well as the principal published sources for early Massachusetts genealogy.

If you aren’t familiar with Ms. Larson’s work, she is the acclaimed author of Companions of Champlain, which provides a concise historical overview of the founding of Quebec and French-Canadian culture. We have featured her informative and incredibly reader-friendly work on our blog in recent posts including Genealogy Isn’t Just Finding Dead People, and Maine Genealogy Resources Part I and Part II.

Digging into your family history can be a labor of love. Ms. Larson’s contribution of Genealogy at a Glance: Massachusetts Genealogy Research makes tackling your Massachusetts genealogy considerably easier.

Image Credit: “Endicott cutting the cross out of the English flag”, illustration depicting an event that occurred in Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634. By Howard Pyle [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.