A collection of Public Domain images of the Five Civilized Tribes

Federal Records of the Five Civilized Tribes

The following excerpt is from the book, Tracing Ancestors Among the Five Civilized Tribes, by Rachal Mills Lennon. This body of work has been the best-selling guide to a very difficult area of research for over a decade.

Ms. Lennon, M.A., CG, specializes in resolving difficult Southern research problems and reconstructing obscure lives, especially those of Native American, African American, and yeoman white families.

A Board-certified genealogist since 1985, Lennon holds degrees from the University of Virginia and the University of Alabama in architectural history, historic preservation and history, with emphasis on the Southern frontier. She is the author, editor, and compiler of six books, as well as award-winning problem-solving essays and case studies published in national-level peer-reviewed journals.

Federal Records of the Five Civilized Tribes

Historical Background

The history and culture of the American South are unique, owing chiefly to the intermingling of the races and the diverse ethnic backgrounds of countless families. Modern Southerners proudly boast traditions–real or not–of Native American ancestry. Odds are, these traditions lead directly back to the so-called Five Civilized Tribes. The Chickasaw, Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole Indians dominated a broad swath of territory from North Carolina to Mississippi before their forced removal westward. Long hailed for their adaptability to “white” ways (hence the designation “civilized”), these nations have gained near honorific status among Southeastern genealogists.

Continue reading…

A_choctaw_woman

New Release for September – A New Series of Native American Records

CHOCTAW BY BLOOD. Enrollment Cards, 1898-1914. Volume V, by Jeff Bowen. Volume V in a new series of Native American records from Mr. Jeff Bowen enumerates the sometimes contentious enrollment of Choctaw tribesmen by the Dawes Commission. The results of these proceedings are contained in 6100 Choctaw enrollment cards (National Archive Microfilm M-1186, Rolls 39-46), which list householders’ ages, sex, degree of blood, the parties’ relationship to head of household, county,  Dawes Roll Number, and date of enrollment by the Secretary of Interior.  Mr. Bowen’s transcriptions also give the enrollee’s parents’ names as well as miscellaneous notes pertaining to the enrollee’s circumstances, when required. The fifth volume in this series is now available. Together, all five volumes identify more than 17,000 persons.

Image credit: A Choctaw woman, via Wikimedia Commons.